Home / Wheels & Tires / How to Ship Wheels Cheap & Safe

 

I’ve shipped wheels & tires across the country several different times without issues in this manner, so I thought I’d write a quick post to detail my process. In this post I’ll go over how I package wheels (either with or without tires) as well as how to ship wheels cheaply through various carriers. Typically you can find everything you need to package the wheels around the house (especially if you’re an Amazon Prime addict like me and get boxes from them all of the time) except for maybe plastic wrap and foam padding and a good box cutter which you can pick up cheap from Amazon (and get even more cardboard to boot).

Cost to Ship Wheels:

Generally I budget about $50 per wheel+tire  or a little less if is just wheel only. Get the buyer’s zip code and use both FedEx and UPS shipping quote estimators to get a more accurate cost. Depending on the wheel and tire size the weight may vary, but I usually guesstimate about 50 lbs if mounted to a tire or 25 lbs if unmounted. These estimates are great for quoting a shipping price to the buyer so they can understand the final cost – then you can try to make a little savings to add a little profit to your margin that will help cover the time and hassle (and material cost!) of packaging and dropping off the wheels:

  • Cross-shop FedEx, UPS, and DHL – be sure to use a FedEx & UPS account to get savings for an online quote. In the past I’ve found FedEx cheaper typically, but sometimes it’s the reverse for reasons I can’t begin to understand.
  • Join the UPS eBay Sellers Program – you can use the eBay discount rate by linking your eBay sellers account to your UPS account which saves you money right out the gate. If you’ve recently sold something on UPS in the last 60 days, go into your recently sold item and print a new shipping label and you can get an even better discount.
  • Ship to a Business Address – see if you can get a business address from the buyer to have the wheels delivered to, which sometimes saves money compared to a residential address.
  • Consider brokers like Shipnex – I’ve heard mixed reviews on them, but anyone that deals in volume can typically get a good discount so it’s worth checking out. Likewise if you have a friend or family member that works for a business that ships a lot, they probably get a commercial rate and you can see if they’ll let you print a label from their account that will apply the discount. Be sure you trust whoever will be shipping wheels on your behalf, as they will be the middle men if you need to file an insurance claim. As a cautionary tale a guy on Audizine once offered to ship a hood using his Mom’s company UPS account and it was significantly damaged in transit. When I filed a claim UPS picked up the hood to return to sender, but then the guy ghosted me and I never got a UPS pay out since he wouldn’t talk to UPS on my behalf and didn’t have the hood anymore either. To this day I think the person kept both the hood and the insurance settlement, but since he lives across the country from me I was never able to hunt him down and find out. A company like Shipnex is much safer than trusting a random person on the internet, but still less direct than working with FedEx or UPS yourself.
  • Use Greyhound at Your Own Risk – you can ship things really cheap on Greyhound, but there is no tracking and no guarantee on when it will arrive. I shipped a hood on Greyhound once and it arrived completely mangled several weeks later, so I’ll never try that again. They basically treat it like it is baggage of a passenger and put it in the cargo area, but if they need extra room for actual passengers they will remove your item, store at the bus station, then load on the next bus that has room…the larger the item, the more likely it will be taken out and put back in a bunch of times, and each time greatly increases your risk of loss or damage.

Be sure to include ample insurance, it doesn’t really cost much (if anything?) extra and you’ll be glad you have it if something happens…do all of the packaging yourself and print the label at home, so that when you go to a drop off center you’re just literally dropping the package off. If they print the label in the store, it will cost more since they give a discount for printing online.

Packaging Tips:

If the wheels still have tires mounted, then cut out cardboard circles to cover the wheel itself (like pictured at the top of this post – it doesn’t need to cover the tire, the rubber can be exposed). Tape the cardboard to the tires and then pick up some plastic wrap and just totally cover the entire wheel/tire. Slightly deflate the tire just so the rubber gives a little more cushion and the sidewalls get a little thicker, then stick a packaging label and you’re all set. I can normally just find old Amazon boxes lying around to get the cardboard to cover the wheels, and if the boxes aren’t big enough you can basically tape two boxes together. If you want to be extra cautious you can use dish foam padding to create a little extra padding between the wheel face and the cardboard.

If the wheel is unmounted, that is fine too. There are a couple of options – if you know a good tire or tuning shop in the area, give them a ring and see if they have any extra wheel boxes they’d be willing to give to you. Places like Discount Tire or even car dealerships get tons of wheels shipped to them every day, and generally they just throw out the boxes. This is easiest option since wheel companies have boxes built made specifically to ship wheels so you can just place the wheels in the box and be done. If they’re asking for money or saying no, you can often go dumpster diving and just fetch them yourself if you feel like being aggressive about it. If this isn’t an option, then head to a local grocery store and ask if they have any boxes lying around – they’ll typically give you all sorts of boxes they’ll give you for free, or you can even look in the dumpsters behind big business like this and they’re full of cardboard boxes used to ship items that are then tossed out nearly daily. Cut out circles like before to cover the front and back faces of the wheels, but keep the circle a little larger than the face of the wheel so you can bend the cardboard down to protect the full outer edge/lip of the wheel. Once the cardboard is covering as you see fit, use foam padding and plastic wrap to hold everything place and add extra cushioning. Then get a medium or large box depending on the dimensions of the wheels (this 18x18x16 is perfect for two 18×8 wheels, for instance) and place two wheels in each box, with plenty of cardboard between them for padding so the wheels don’t clank together. Fill the empty spaces of the boxes with old magazine or newspaper crumpled up so nothing shifts.

3SDM Wheels

Any other tips, tricks, or tips to get cheap shipping on wheels?  Leave a comment…

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About the author: Nick Roshon

 

Nick has been an Audi owner and fanatic for the last 10 years, and started Nick's Car Blog in 2009 to share DIYs and pictures of his A4. Currently he drives a 2012 Audi TT-RS, and has previously owned a B7 S4, B7 A4, and an 82 Audi Coupe (GT) LeMons race car. In his day job, Nick is a digital marketer and lives in San Diego, CA, USA.

 

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3 Comments

  1. I have a cracked rim on my Q7, should I just pay for the replacement rim from Audi or is there a less expensive option that anyone would recommend?

  2. Hi Dan – if the crack is small, it might be repairable. If not, go look on eBay and you can usually find a replacement for much cheaper than going through the dealer. Or check out any of the vendors on my recommended list: http://nickscarblog.com/cars/audi-part-dismantlers-cheap-audi-parts

  3. Fantastic blog!! Really 🙂

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